New Clinical Trial: GS-1101 in Combination with Bendamustine and Rituximab for Previously Treated CLL

Update: this study is closed to enrollment. 

The Weill Cornell Lymphoma Program is now recruiting men and women with previously treated, recurrent chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) for a clinical trial evaluating the experimental drug GS-1101 (also called Idelalisib, formerly called CAL-101), combined with bendamustine and rituximab, in treating CLL. The study sponsor is Gilead Sciences, Inc, and the principal investigator at Weill Cornell is Dr. Richard Furman. For more information about the study, please call Amelyn Rodgriguez, RN at (212) 746-1362 or e-mail Amelyn at amr2017@med.cornell.edu.

Key Eligibility
  • Age 18 and older
  • Diagnosis of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)
  • Previously treated for CLL
  • Detailed eligibility reviewed when you contact the study team
Study Details

GS-1101 (CAL-101) is a pill designed to block some of the cell functions that cause CLL to grow and survive and may help control the disease. Rituximab and bendamustine are approved by the FDA as a treatment for CLL. The study will help determine whether adding GS-1101 (CAL-101) to the standard treatment of rituximab and bendamustine will have a better effect on controlling CLL.

Study participants will be randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups:

  • Group A: GS-1101 and rituximab/bendamustine
  • Group B: Rituximab/bendamustine and placebo (an inactive pill that looks like GS-1101 but contains no medicine)

After 20 weeks of therapy with rituximab, bendamustine and GS-1101 or placebo, participants will continue with GS-1101 or placebo as long as their CLL is controlled.

Author: lymphomaprogram

Located on the Upper East Side of New York City, the Lymphoma Program at Weill Cornell Medical College/NewYork Presbyterian Hospital is internationally recognized for our efforts to enable patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin disease and related disorders to have the best possible clinical outcome, including cure when possible.

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