ACP-196: What You Should Know about this New Agent for B-cell Lymphomas and CLL

What is it?

ACP-196 is a second generation Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor that can be taken orally. It was developed as an alternative to ibrutinib and was designed to be more selective in targeting BTK. Like ibrutinib it inhibits BTK, a protein important in the development, activation, proliferation, and survival of B-cells. ACP-196 is currently being investigated as a treatment for various B-cell lymphomas, as well as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

How does ACP-196 work?

ACP-196 works by inhibiting the activity of BTK, a protein important in the development of B-cells. By preventing the activation of the B-cell antigen receptor signaling pathway, it slows down the growth of cancerous B-cells caused by the overactive BTK.

Does ACP-196 have any side effects?

The side effects for ACP-196 are acceptable and manageable with very few side effects being considered severe.

What is the difference between ACP-196 and ibrutinib?

ACP-196 and ibrutinib are similar in that they both inhibit BTK using the same binding site. They also are both effective in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. The difference is that ACP-196 inhibits fewer off target enzymes. By being more specific for BTK, the drug may have fewer side effects than ibrutinib, while maintaining similar anti-cancer activity.

How can I access ACP-196?

There are currently numerous clinical trials opened at Weill Cornell Medicine that use ACP-196 for various indications of CLL and B-cell lymphomas. A full list can be found on our Joint Clinical Trials website.

Author: lymphomaprogram

Located on the Upper East Side of New York City, the Lymphoma Program at Weill Cornell Medical College/NewYork Presbyterian Hospital is internationally recognized for our efforts to enable patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin disease and related disorders to have the best possible clinical outcome, including cure when possible.

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