The Body’s Military Defense

Lymphoma is a collective term representing over 100 different types of the disease. Disease subtyping allows clinicians to determine a more precise diagnosis for each individual patient and plan optimal treatment accordingly.

A small percentage of lymphomas in the United States are classified as Hodgkin lymphomas, with the remaining majority falling under the non-Hodgkin category. Further, approximately 90 percent of non-Hodgkin lymphomas are B-cell malignancies, versus 10 percent T-cell.

Here’s how B and T cells act like branches of the military to protect the body from disease – and what happens when these immune cells are unable to perform their jobs adequately.

The Body's Military Defense

For the origin of this analogy, check out this episode of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Bloodline podcast, featuring our own Dr. John Leonard.

 

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