2020 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting

The American Society of Hematology (ASH) is the world’s largest professional society serving clinicians and scientists who work to conquer blood diseases. This year the 62nd ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition – the premier conference in malignant and non-malignant hematology – will bring together approximately 25,000 hematology professionals from around the world virtually.

As always, our team is proud to contribute new lymphoma discoveries for presentation at the meeting. We’ll be covering the conference research updates on our social media channels and here on our blog throughout the duration of the meeting.

Dr. Peter Martin, Chief of the Weill Cornell Lymphoma Program shares some personal thoughts regarding the 2020 ASH Annual Meeting.

While it’s impossible to ignore the trauma that accompanied the year 2020, every December brings a display of the hopes and efforts of thousands of international researchers presenting their data at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH). I’m so proud to say that research is alive and well in the Lymphoma Program at Weill Cornell Medicine.

Over the next 3 days, our team of physicians and scientists will be presenting ground breaking research on the world’s top stage. Min Xia, PhD has the distinction of being selected to deliver a presentation in the ASH Plenary Session, the forum for the top 6 research abstracts of the entire conference. Dr. Ari Melnick is being honored for his work in epigenetics and will be delivering the prestigious Ernest Buetler lecture. We have numerous oral and poster presentations, including several from our fellows, residents, and medical students — the future leaders of our field.

Peter Martin, MD, MS

Additionally, Dr. John Leonard continued his #LeonardList tradition of selecting 10 noteworthy lymphoma abstracts leading up to the meeting. In addition to posting his selections on Twitter, he discussed this research in detail in the third-annual Leonard List CancerCast Podcast episode – with 5 bonus podcast-only abstracts. Dr. Leonard selects this research from all the lymphoma-related abstracts, looking at both oral and poster sessions.

Tune in!

Listen to the full episode and other great CancerCast topics on Apple PodcastsGoogle Podcasts, or online at Weill Cornell Medicine.

Follow our Twitter feed for additional updates throughout the conference.

New Research Points to HDAC3 Inhibition as a Potential Game-Changing Treatment for Specific Lymphoma Subtypes

By Sucharita Mistry, PhD

B-cell lymphomas such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) are blood cancers of the immune cells. A vast majority of B-cell lymphomas typically display a high frequency of genetic alterations. Since lymphomas show remarkable genetic diversity, a big challenge for scientists is not only to determine which genes are mutated in these diseases, but also to identify “actionable” genetic alterations that can respond to targeted therapies.

Screen Shot 2020-06-17 at 10.54.10 AM

“Discovering how different mutations are involved in causing the disease is a major key to advancing novel mechanism-based precision therapies and immunotherapies for lymphomas, with potentially less toxic side-effects,” says Dr. Ari Melnick, a world-renowned physician-scientist at Weill Cornell Medicine.

Dr. Melnick led groundbreaking research that defines the genetic underpinnings of CREBBP mutation in lymphomas, paving the way for new therapeutic avenues. The findings of this study were recently published in Cancer Discovery.

The CREBBP gene encodes a kind of histone acetyltransferase (HAT), an enzyme that introduces small chemical tags called acetyl groups on histones, which are the major structural proteins of chromosomes. The chemical modifications on histones are termed as epigenetic changes, and they determine whether genes are turned on or off. The CREBBP gene, which is an epigenetic modifier, is frequently mutated in DLBCL and FL.

The Melnick research team, in collaboration with scientists at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, characterized the functional consequences of CREBBP mutation in lymphomas. Using a powerful CRISPR gene-editing technology, the researchers engineered lymphoma cell lines that differed only in the CREBBP mutation status. The research team discovered two different types of CREBBP mutations that either truncate the protein or inactivate the HAT domain, the latter associated with poor clinical outcomes.

This study showed that CREBBP mutation disrupts key biological pathways resulting in abnormal silencing of tumor-suppressive and antigen-presenting pathway genes. This disruption allows lymphoma cells to hide from the immune system so that they cannot be recognized and attacked by the T-cells that play an essential role in the body’s immune response.

More importantly, the malfunction in immune surveillance was restored by an HDAC3 inhibitor, a drug that specifically reverses the histone acetylation defect caused by CREBBP mutation. Notably, selective inhibition of HDAC3 reversed the epigenetic abnormalities, halted lymphoma growth and induced the expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) class II protein, enabling the T cells of the immune system to recognize and kill lymphoma cells. The research team also demonstrated that combination of an HDAC3 inhibitor with an immune checkpoint inhibitor (PD-1/PD-L1 blockade) results in synergistic anti-lymphoma immunity effects.

These findings uncover a novel mechanistic link between CREBBP mutation and immune surveillance dysfunction in lymphomas that can be counteracted by an HDAC3 inhibitor, providing a potentially game-changing approach for restoring anti-tumor immunity.

“HDAC3 inhibition provides an attractive therapeutic avenue for DLBCL and FL and may have enhanced potency in CREBBP-mutant tumors,” says Dr. Melnick. “We are very excited to translate this research into clinical trials that could potentially lead to the development of novel mechanism-based immune epigenetic therapy for CREBBP-mutant lymphomas.”

 

COVID-19 and Cancer: Helpful Resources for Lymphoma Patients

The Weill Cornell Medicine Lymphoma Program team remains committed to supporting and protecting the health and safety of our patient community during this challenging time. With COVID-19 dominating the news and impacting our everyday lives, many people may be left wondering which sources to trust and which recommendations to follow when it comes to understanding the coronavirus and staying safe during this unprecedented time.

We developed this article and compiled a handful of reliable resources designed to help lymphoma patients — at our center and beyond – best navigate this rapidly changing situation.

COVID-19 Basics and General Guidelines

Physicians and staff within the division of Hematology and Oncology at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital are here to provide guidance and support to our cancer patients and their loved ones. We encourage you to review the information outlined in our COVID-19 and Cancer Guide, where we provide answers to our patient community’s most frequently asked questions. You are also welcome to call our COVID-19 hotline at (646) 697-4000 with questions at any time.

If you have COVID-19 symptoms or suspect that you have been in contact with someone with COVID-19, contact your oncologist for further instruction. If you need in-person medical attention, your doctor will advise you regarding the necessary steps and preparations to protect you and others at the facility before you arrive. Please do not visit your doctor’s office or the emergency department without first being in touch with your healthcare team.

COVID-19 and Lymphoma

In the Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) webinar entitled “Coronavirus and What the Lymphoma Community Needs to Know,” our own Dr. John Leonard reviews the current medical understanding and response to COVID-19 (per March 19, 2020). Dr. Leonard explains why we all must work together to “flatten the curve,” and addresses frequently asked questions surrounding immune system suppression and the coronavirus, lymphoma treatment during the pandemic, the use of masks and transmission of the disease between different groups such as children, the elderly and pets.

The LRF also created a COVID-19 fact sheet complete with prevention tips and questions to ask your oncologist. Weill Cornell Lymphoma Program Chief Dr. Peter Martin and an infectious disease specialist contributed to and medically reviewed this information.

Appointments and Video Visits

Please know that we remain dedicated to the health and wellbeing of our lymphoma community and that continuing to provide world-class cancer care for our oncology patients is important to us. As part of our mission to provide care during this unprecedented time, the Hematology & Oncology division has been implementing extensive patient-centered precautions. These include efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19 within our facilities and the expansion of virtual video-based appointments.

The Weill Cornell Lymphoma Program continues to be able to offer new and current patients the cancer care they need. We also provide expert, multidisciplinary care for patients with lymphoma who need medical attention for COVID-19.

Video visits allow patients to receive high-quality lymphoma care from the comfort and convenience of their own homes, while adhering to safe social distancing parameters recommended to minimize exposure to other individuals. Our video visit capabilities also extend to patients who wish to schedule a virtual second opinion.

To schedule a video visit, please follow the instructions below. Our team will work with you to obtain any necessary medical records prior to your visit. We will inform you if we believe that you are better suited for an in-person visit.

New Patients
Please call (646) 962-2800.

Existing Patients
Please call (646) 962-2064.

Learn more about video visits. Once your video visit is scheduled, use this guide to connect with your doctor.

Video visits use the same insurance coverage as in-person appointments, and your copayment and deductible still apply.

Visitor Policy

While we recognize the value of family and friends’ support throughout lymphoma diagnosis and treatment, keeping patients and their loved ones safe requires temporary limits on the number of people allowed to accompany each patient to an appointment. Please note that our policies continue to evolve during these unprecedented times. Click here for our latest COVID-19 visitation guidelines.

Additional Resources

Patients are welcome to call the WCM/NYP COVID-19 hotline – (646) 697-4000 – with any questions. Please note that this hotline is available as a public service to provide information only, and not to diagnose, treat or render a medical opinion.

Patients may also consult the following resources.

Ways to Help

It can be easy to feel powerless in the midst of a global pandemic, but there are ways that you can help. In fact, the biggest impact that people – sick or healthy – can make in the fight against COVID-19 is simply to stay at home to curb the spread of disease and its potential to overwhelm the healthcare system.

Those willing and able to contribute to Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian’s response to COVID-19 can make a donation to support the purchasing of ventilators and personal protective equipment (PPE), and the physical and emotional wellbeing of healthcare workers on the frontlines of the outbreak.

A fundraiser was also created to provide nutritious, high-quality meals to the New York City doctors, nurses and ancillary staff leading the fight against COVID-19 as part of medical intensive care units.