REDLAMP 9: Prognostic Factors for Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Plasmablastic Lymphoma

Plasmablastic lymphoma is an aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma commonly associated with HIV infection, and an unfavorable diagnosis. Though it’s also often found in immunocompetent patients. The Journal of Hematology & Oncology recently published a clinicopathologic analysis of patients with plasmablastic lymphoma, and measured their outcomes. In this video, Dr. John Allan explains the results of this study, and offers takeaways for patients with this aggressive lymphoma.

Previous #REDLAMP entries can be viewed on our Youtube channel.

We encourage you to follow the Lymphoma Progam on Twitter, Youtube, and Facebook where we will highlight new videos are about research publications as they are released. We also welcome your feedback, suggestions and questions about this project. If you have other questions about our lymphoma program or clinical trials or would like to see one of our lymphoma specialists, please contact us at 212-746-2919.


New Clinical Trial: A Phase 1/2 Proof of Concept Study of the Combination of ACP-196 & ACP-319 in Subjects with B-cell Malignancies

The Weill Cornell Lymphoma Program has recently opened a new clinical trial for men and women with previously treated B-cell malignancies. The study sponsor is Acerta Pharmaceuticals, and the principal investigator at Weill Cornell is Richard Furman M.D.. For more information about the study, please call Amelyn Rodgriguez, RN at (212) 746-1362 or e-mail Amelyn at amr2017@med.cornell.edu.

Key Eligibility

  • Men and women age 18 and older.
  • Diagnosis of non-GCB DLBCL, MCL, FL, WM, or CLL/SLL.
  • At least one prior therapy meeting the criteria for relevant disease type.
  • Detailed eligibility reviewed when you contact the study team.

Study Summary

This clinical trial is for men and women with previously treated B-cell malignancies.

In recent years, clinical trials with small molecule inhibitors of Btk and PI3K-delta have produced high response rates with few drug-related toxicities in subjects with B-cell malignancies. Specifically, ibrutinib and idelalisib have shown very encouraging results and each have gained FDA approval in specific patient populations, however, some subjects develop progressive disease or resistance after a period of time on these treatments. This study aims to assess the clinical potential and safety of a dual inhibition approach by combining ACP-196, a second generation Btk inhibitor, with ACP-319, a second generation PI3K inhibitor. The study will provide more information about whether this targeted combination therapy can benefit subjects with B-cell malignancies over single agent therapies or traditional chemotherapy combinations without an increase in toxicity.

Subjects will receive ACP-196 and ACP-319 continuously throughout the study as long as they are responding to therapy and not experiencing unacceptable side effects. Both ACP-196 and ACP-319 are administered orally twice daily. After discontinuing treatment, subjects will remain in long-term follow-up until they receive their next therapy.


REDLAMP 8: Does a Geriatric Assessment Hold Prognostic Value for Patients with Aggressive NHL?

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). It is an aggressive disease that often affects older patients.The journal Leukemia & Lymphoma, recently published a study investigating whether a geriatric assessment would be of prognostic value for patients with aggressive NHL. This included assessments of nutrition, frailty, cognitive ability, performance status, and relevant laboratory values. In this video, new faculty member, Dr. Sarah Rutherford explains the results of this study, and offers takeaways for older patients with aggressive NHL.

Previous #REDLAMP entries can be viewed on our Youtube channel.

We encourage you to follow the Lymphoma Progam on Twitter, Youtube, and Facebook where we will highlight new videos are about research publications as they are released. We also welcome your feedback, suggestions and questions about this project. If you have other questions about our lymphoma program or clinical trials or would like to see one of our lymphoma specialists, please contact us at 646-962-2064.


REDLAMP 6: Entecavir vs. Lamivudine in Preventing Hepatitis B Reactivation in Untreated DLBCL

Reactivation of the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be a serious and life threatening complication for lymphoma patients who receive rituximab based treatment like R-CHOP. In this video Dr. Jia Ruan explained the results from a randomized phase 3 trial published in JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association). In this study researchers compared the effectiveness of Entecavir and lamivudine in preventing HBV reactivation and clinically significant hepatitis in patients with DLBCL, who are receiving R-CHOP.

Previous #REDLAMP entries can be viewed on our Youtube channel.

We encourage you to follow the Lymphoma Progam on Twitter, Youtube, and Facebook where we will highlight new videos are about research publications as they are released. We also welcome your feedback, suggestions and questions about this project. If you have other questions about our lymphoma program or clinical trials or would like to see one of our lymphoma specialists, please contact us at 646-962-2074.


Cross Campus Collaboration Leads to Potential New Development of Treatment of B-Cell Lymphomas

Researchers at Cornell University announced the development of a second generation of functional, synthetic immune organoids that can be independently controlled by medical researchers. This development has many potential utilities though it hold special promise in the development of treatments for B cell lymphomas. Specifically in testing compounds with the potential to eliminate the malignization of lymphocytes and/or to increase the antibody production capacity of B-cells.

“The synthetic organ is bio-inspired by secondary immune organs like the lymph node or spleen. It is made from gelatin-based biomaterials reinforced with nanoparticles and seeded with cells, and it mimics the anatomical microenvironment of lymphoid tissue. Like a real organ, the organoid converts B cells – which make antibodies that respond to infectious invaders – into germinal centers, which are clusters of B cells that activate, mature and mutate their antibody genes when the body is under attack. Germinal centers are a sign of infection and are not present in healthy immune organs.”

The immune organoid was created in the lab of Dr. Ankur Singh at Cornell University, and resulted from an ongoing collaboration with Dr. Leandro Cerchietti, a research collaborator of the Lymphoma Program at Weill Cornell Medical College, and Dr. Akhilesh Gaharwar of Texas A&M University. This collaboration between Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medical College is known as the P.A.Th pipeline. P.A.Th. was designed to expedite the bench to bedside approach taken by the Lymphoma Program as Weill Cornell Medical College.

For patients with B-cell lymphoma Dr. Singh commented,

“In the long run, we anticipate that the ability to drive immune reaction ex vivo at controllable rates grants us the ability to reproduce immunological events with tunable parameters for better mechanistic understanding of B cell development and generation of B cell tumors, as well as screening and translation of new classes of drugs.” 

Full results for this new discovery were published online in Biomaterials, and will appear in print. Look to this space for further updates on further collaborations between Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medical College.


New Clinical Trial: A Phase II Trial of PET-Directed Therapy for Limited Stage DLBCL

The Weill Cornell Lymphoma Program has recently opened a new clinical trial for men and women with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). The study sponsor is the Southwest Oncology Group, and the principal investigator at Weill Cornell is Peter Martin, M.D.. For more information about the study, please call Amelyn Rodgriguez, RN at (212) 746-1362 or e-mail Amelyn at amr2017@med.cornell.edu.

Key Eligibility

  • Men and women age 18 years and older
  • Patient must have biopsy proven diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
  • Patient cannot have received prior chemotherapy, radiation, or antibody therapy for lymphoma
  • Detailed eligibility reviewed when you contact the study team

Study Details 

This phase II trial studies how well PET-directed chemotherapy works in treating patients with limited-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, such as yttrium Y 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. Comparing results of diagnostic procedures, such as PET scan and CT scan, done before, during, and after chemotherapy may help doctors predict a patient’s response to treatment and help plan the best treatment.

Primarily, this study will assess the 5 year progression- free survival (PFS) rate in patients with newly diagnosed limited-stage diffuse, large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) using positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan to direct therapy after 3 courses of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone (R-CHOP).

Patients will be stratified according to whether the patient was upstaged to advanced stage DLBCL, based on local review of the baseline PET/CT (yes vs no).

  • Chemotherapy: Patients receive R-CHOP comprising rituximab IV, cyclophosphamide IV over 30-60 minutes, vincristine sulfate IV, and doxorubicin hydrochloride IV on day 1, and prednisone orally on days 1-5. Treatment repeats every 21 days for 3* courses. NOTE: *Patients found to have advanced stage DLBCL based on local review of the baseline PET scan receive 6 courses of R-CHOP.
  • FDG/PET – Radiotherapy: Patients undergo fludeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT scan at baseline, on days 15-18 of course 3, and at 12 weeks after completion of course 3. Patients with complete response (PET scan negative) receive one additional course of R-CHOP as above. Patients with partial response (PET scan positive) undergo involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) 5 days a week for approximately 4-5 weeks.
  • Monoclonal antibody: Beginning 3-6 weeks after completion of IFRT, patients receive yttrium Y 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan IV over 10 minutes and rituximab IV on day 1 and on day 7, 8, or 9.
  • Patients may undergo blood sample collection at baseline for correlative studies. Bone marrow tissue samples may be also collected for correlative studies.
  • After completion of study therapy, patients are followed up every 6 months for 2 years and then yearly for 5 years.

REDLAMP 4: Circulating Tumor DNA & CT Monitoring for Untreated DLBCL – A Correlative Biomarker Study

First-line chemotherapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is given with curative intent, but is not always effective. In this video, Dr. Peter Martin discusses the implications of a recently published study in Lancet Oncology, which aimed to discover whether a blood test capable of detecting circulating tumor DNA might predict treatment success or failure. In the future, blood tests may be added to, or even replace, current standard surveillance methods like CT scans or PET scans.

Previous #REDLAMP entries can be viewed on our Youtube channel.

We encourage you to follow the Lymphoma Progam on Twitter, Youtube, and Facebook where we will highlight new videos are about research publications as they are released. We also welcome your feedback, suggestions and questions about this project. If you have other questions about our lymphoma program or clinical trials or would like to see one of our lymphoma specialists, please contact us at 646-962-2074.


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