AACR 2014: IL10 autoregulatory loop displays promise as new therapeutic target for DLBCL

shaknovich_rBy Rita Shaknovich MD, PHD

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common aggressive lymphoma that represents 30-40% of newly diagnosed cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but accounts for up to 80% of lymphoma-related deaths. Although R-CHOP remains the standard first line therapy, it has more recently been associated with a frequent lack of response in DLBCL patients. This lack of response has enforced the necessity for finding alternate therapeutic targets.

At the 2014 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College reported on their recent findings. In a late breaking abstract the Shaknovich Lab reported on the potential of the IL10 receptor as a new biomarker and therapeutic target in DLBCL. The  hypothesis is that DLBCL is dependent on the feed-forward autostimulatory loop that begins from the autocrine IL10 secretion and stimulation of overexpressed receptors leading to cell proliferation and that blocking the receptor would lead to cell death.

The research team of postdoctoral fellow Wendy Beguelin and research associate Seema Sawh determined that blocking IL10R results in specific inhibition of signaling through JAK1/2 and loss of phosphorylation at STAT3Y705 immediately after treatment. The inhibition of signaling through MAPK and phosphorylation of STAT3S727 came at a later time in treatment. The inhibition of signaling was sustained for days with only one drug treatment leading to induction of apoptosis. Anti-IL10R treatment resulted in significant downregulation of IL10 and IL10RA transcription, leading to interruption of IL10-IL10R autostimulatory loop.

IL10R is a novel therapeutic target in DLBCL that allows for easy detection and targeting. Shaknovich Lab is planning further animal studies and hopes to develop therapeutic antibody for clinical use in patients.

Author: lymphomaprogram

Located on the Upper East Side of New York City, the Lymphoma Program at Weill Cornell Medical College/NewYork Presbyterian Hospital is internationally recognized for our efforts to enable patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin disease and related disorders to have the best possible clinical outcome, including cure when possible.

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